Dark Star

Dark Star by Robert Greenfield

Book: Dark Star by Robert Greenfield Read Free Book Online
Authors: Robert Greenfield
tuning because he said it wasn’t until a couple months later when he found out how to really tune it. It’s very primitive and it’s very much that style of plunging out and jumping in with both feet first. The solo itself is basically two licks used very modestly. Very modestly.
    Sara Ruppenthal Garcia: I first met Phil Lesh back at the Chateau when he was a music student. He was this madman coming in with these musical scores where there were great slashes of music going down the paper and all over. He was just so wildly excited about avant garde music, which didn’t seem to have anything to do with what Jerry was doing. Jerry could share his enthusiasm for some of it but it wasn’t his thing.
    Peter Albin: Lesh lived down the street with a friend of my brother. I’d go over there and I’d see these charts that Lesh had written. I couldn’t believe this weird shit. Like a symphony for fifty guitars. They were all circular. It was a circular chart. A bizarre-looking thing. How do you read this?
    John “Marmaduke” Dawson: I remember going to a couple rehearsals of Mother McCree’s Uptown Jug Champions. Various publications have listed me as a member of that band but I never was. I was at the Warlocks’ first gig at the pizza parlor at Magoo’s. This was when they finally got all their shit together. I think they rehearsed in Dana’s for the first one and then they got this gig at Magoo’s. The thing about Dana was that he had all the stuff to play on so they let him be the bass player. He couldn’t play bass for shit, man. They gave him the best break possible and he just couldn’t do it.
    Sue Swanson: I drove Jerry up to the city the day that he went to find Phil to get him to play in the band. We went up in my car. It just wasn’t working with Dana Morgan playing bass. When they fired Dana from the band, it was tough. Jerry’s guitar was from Dana Morgan’s Music. So all of a sudden, he didn’t have an ax. I remember him and his wife Sara sitting there trying to figure it out. “We’ve got two hundred dollars in the bank. How much is this ax? Maybe I can borrow money from my mom....” I’m not sure how but Jerry got the guitar. It was a lousy place to rehearse anyway. The whole room was instruments. There were cymbals all over the place. When they played there, everything played right back at them.
    Marshall Leicester: In terms of forming the Warlocks, I especially remember Lesh as being the decisive force in that. It was not so much Lesh himself, although Phil was obviously extremely important, but the moves that got Dana Morgan out of the band. That was the moment at which something which was partly being done as a concession to grownup bourgeois life and the need to make money and all the rest of it turned into the possibility of making something greater. Dana was their original bass player. And when Lesh came along, it was a great deal more than a question of just replacing one musician with a better musician. Because Jerry took a real leap there. I remember some of us chicken bourgeois types being afraid he’d lose his job at Morgan’s by firing his boss’s son. But Lesh was adamant about that. I think some of us went to Phil at one point and said, “Would you back off a little? We’re worried about whether Jerry’s going to be able to survive.” And Lesh said, “No way. I’ve waited too long for this.” Phil was really ambitious and could be really hard-nosed in a way that was always difficult for Jerry. Yet what often looked like a kind of narcissism on Jerry’s part was in fact him being more intense and in a certain way much more ruthless than others. I heard people say that you hadn’t been dropped until you’d been dropped by Garcia. When you became no longer of interest to him because he was moving in a different direction.
    John “Marmaduke” Dawson: So

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